“Youtube came in like a wrecking ball”

Youtube is a platform that is built around the uploading and sharing of videos, and many people rely on this networking system not only to spread ideas and enjoy entertainment, but also for creating an income.
Youtube personalities are a huge hit on the internet, and how much they earn depends on the size of their fan base and their viewers statistics, although not all of the profit some of them earn is exactly legal, and it can be easy to upload content that violates copyright laws if you’re not careful.

“These are namely gamers, uploading gameplay footage either raw or with voice over and then earning money from advertising revenue on Youtube” says Cramgaming.com (2013).”It can be debated whether it’s right or wrong for people to earn money using other peoples derivative works in context of making something unique from it, however, it seems the industry is adopting an overall tougher stance on this”.

In December 2013, Youtube updated its copyright laws in an attempt to address complaints of theft of profit and original ideas, the new laws mostly targeted gaming channels, and sent out thousands of flags to gaming videos all over the platform (Gutelle, 2013) The problem with this new system, was that popular online gamers and creators starting getting flagged for their own original content by suspicious third party complaints.

“My YouTube channel was temporarily terminated and suffered a 21-hour outage after receiving copyright violations that have now been withdrawn. The effects weren’t only felt during that period, either. It took us a week to recover and start receiving our pre-takedown viewership numbers” said Ashkan Karbasfrooshan, the founder and CEO of WatchMojo’s, one of Youtubes top 25 most watched channels.

Copyright was created to protect the ideas and creations of individuals, but when anybody can make a claim to that idea and it directly affects the business of that individual, shouldn’t it be monitored and used correctly by the people enforcing it?
YouTube has struggled for years with copyright law — especially when it comes to gaming. You can own something, put it on YouTube, and still get a copyright-violation notice (Grubb, 2014).

 

 

 

 

 

References 

 

Cramgaming.com 2013. Youtube getting tough on video game monetization in 2014 – Cramgaming.com. <http://cramgaming.com/youtube-getting-tough-video-game-monetization-12989/&gt;
viewed on 29 Mar 2014.

 

Grubb, J. 2014. Developer still struggling with YouTube over copyright claim on video of his own game. <http://venturebeat.com/2014/01/24/game-developer-still-struggling-with-youtube-over-copyright-claim-on-his-own-game/&gt;
viewed on 29 Mar 2014.

 

Gutelle, S. 2013. YouTube Is Suddenly Flagging A LOT Of Videos For Copyright Claims. <http://www.tubefilter.com/2013/12/10/youtube-contentid-flag-gaming-videos/&gt;
viewed on 29 Mar 2014.

 

Karbasfrooshan, A. 2013. It’s Time For YouTube’s ContentID & Copyright Policies To Reflect Reality.
<http://www.tubefilter.com/2013/12/23/youtube-contentid-reflects-reality/&gt;
viewed on 29 Mar 2014.

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2 thoughts on ““Youtube came in like a wrecking ball”

  1. You raise a few interesting questions within your article, especially in your concluding line asking “shouldn’t it be monitored and used correctly by the people enforcing it?” I completely agree with you on this position. The people who have enforced these laws must be able to uphold and maintain them, just as much as the users abide by them. After studying this topic tho ii is my honest belief that copy right laws and terms of use are unable to compete with the lightning speeds at which social media platforms are developing.
    You have used great sources for your article and the direct quote taken from Ashkan Karbasfrooshan really emphasises the point you were trying to make.

    Good Job 🙂

    • Thanks Brooke! I’ve had a few problems myself with the copyright laws on Youtube, and i know how frustrating it can be when people report you for fun and you have to spend so much time trying to prove your content is yours, not fun. I think you’re right, it is hard to keep up, i think the way to go about it is to make sure the person reporting you has proof instead of taking every claim so seriously. Thankyou for the feedback 🙂

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